Classic Eggnog and Cooked Eggnog

Classic Egg Nog, Cooked Egg Nog, Egg Nog Recipe, Classic Egg Nog Recipe, Cooked Egg Nog Recipe

Egg Nog

The Saucy household loves Eggnog. It is just one of those holiday beverages that must make an appearance at some point. And I’m not talking about that stuff they sell in the stores, I’m talkin’ about the real McCoy. Eggnog. Made with Eggs. Not cooked. But, for anyone who is squeamish about that idea, I’ve included methods for both Classic and Cooked Eggnog. 

We always, always have Eggnog at Christmas. I gave up store-bought Eggnog in the 80’s and started making it from scratch every year. For a while, Mr. Saucy’s sister would make it and bring it when she came to visit for Christmas.

Then, there was the year that she was driving down from Kentucky with a huge container of Eggnog in the front seat of her car. And she stopped abruptly. And the huge container of Eggnog fell off of the front seat of her car. And the lid popped open. And sticky, gooey, boozy Eggnog poured out all over the passenger-side floor of her car. Yeah. I haven’t heard the end of that one. *big grin*

Now, here’s where I’m going to go all legalese on you:

For women who are pregnant or nursing, or people with compromised immune systems, or people who are germ freaks (*wink*) caution is generally suggested in consuming raw and lightly cooked eggs due to the slight risk of salmonella or other food-borne illness. To reduce this risk, I recommend you use only fresh, properly refrigerated, clean eggs with intact shells, and avoid contact between the yolks or whites and the eggshell. For recipes that call for eggs that are raw or under-cooked when the dish is served, use shell eggs that have been treated to destroy salmonella, by pasteurization or another approved method.

Phew. Now, I am not your mama. I cannot force you to use raw eggs, or consume raw eggs; if you choose to do so, you do so at your own risk. Lord, I hate what we’ve come to with stuff like this. *smile*

Of course, my versions contain booze, but you can make yours without it and I refuse to do another disclaimer about alcohol consumption, people. Or you can make two batches and have one for the kids and one for the grown-ups. Just make it.

P~

Classic Eggnog
 
The holidays are always made more special with homemade Eggnog. This version contains raw egg. Please make some, but also please read the disclaimer about the use of raw eggs.
Author:
Recipe type: Beverage
Ingredients
  • 12 eggs, separated
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1½ cup bourbon
  • ½ cup brandy
  • 4 cups half and half
  • 3 cups heavy cream
  • 1¼ teaspoons freshly ground nutmeg
Instructions
  1. In the bowl of your mixer, beat egg yolks and sugar on low-speed until blended.
  2. Turn mixer to high and beat until thick and pale colored about 10 minutes.
  3. Add bourbon and brandy in a thin drizzle, while continuing to beat at high-speed. Cover and refrigerate at least 20 minutes.
  4. Separately, whip egg whites and whisk to firm peaks.
  5. Pour chilled egg yolk mixture into a large punch bowl; add heavy cream, half and half, and nutmeg, gently fold in egg whites and cream until just blended.
  6. Sprinkle with a bit more nutmeg and serve.
  7. Makes 1 gallon plus 2-4 cups

 

 

Cooked Eggnog
 
The holidays are always made more special with homemade Eggnog. Make some. This version is cooked.
Author:
Recipe type: Beverage
Ingredients
  • 12 eggs, separated
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1½ cup bourbon
  • ½ cup brandy
  • 4 cups half and half
  • 3 cups heavy cream
  • 1¼ teaspoons freshly ground nutmeg
  • (IF YOU AREN'T GOING TO USE THE EGG WHITES:
  • Option 1: Two additional cups of heavy cream and 2 tablespoons sugar.
  • OR
  • Option 2: Two cups of vanilla ice cream.)
Instructions
  1. In the bowl of your mixer, beat egg yolks and sugar on low-speed until blended.
  2. Turn mixer to high and beat until thick and pale colored about 10 minutes.
  3. Set aside.
  4. In a medium saucepan, over high heat, combine the half and half, heavy cream and nutmeg and bring just to a boil, stirring occasionally.
  5. Remove from the heat and gradually temper the hot mixture into the egg and sugar mixture. (Tempering is to slowly drizzle the hot liquid into the eggs, while stirring..you don't want to do it too quickly, or the eggs will scramble.)
  6. Then return everything to the pot and cook until the mixture reaches 160 degrees F.
  7. Remove from the heat, stir in the bourbon, pour into a mixing bowl, and refrigerate to chill.
  8. In a medium mixing bowl, beat the egg whites to soft peaks. With the mixer running gradually add the 2 tablespoons of sugar and beat until stiff peaks form. Whisk the egg whites into the chilled mixture.
  9. (Alternately:
  10. Option 1: If you don't wish to use egg whites, just whisk together the optional heavy cream and sugar until stiff peaks form, and add to the chilled mixture in the same way.
  11. Option 2: Stir in the vanilla ice cream.)

 

About P ~ The Saucy Southerner

I started cooking when I was ten years old. For me, the process of cooking, from inception of a dish, to the execution, to the washing of the pots is sheer delight. I am now retired from a business I still own, in partnership with my husband. I used to work six days a week and still cook every night. Now, I'm gardening, still cooking, always having fun and hoping to share my joy with you. Thank you for reading...and commenting! P~
This entry was posted in Cocktails, Desserts, Eggs, Holiday Cooking. Bookmark the permalink.

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